Browsing articles tagged with " Marketing"
Feb 14, 2008
csalomonlee

Valentine's Day: Salsa Story

Valentines Day hearts

Valentine’s Day can either create fear or joy in your heart. Several years ago, I was dreading another lonely Valentine’s Day. I didn’t want to stay at home but I didn’t want to feel out of place on this “romantic” day.  

My first love has always been dancing – ballet, tap, jazz, even hula as a girl. One day, I read an article in the SF Gate about salsa dance lessons on Valentine’s Day. I was intrigued.  

The organizer, Evan of Salsa Crazy, positioned the event as a great way for single people to mingle, have fun and not be intimidated. I went to the event and it worked on several levels:

  1. Targeted single men and women
  2. Provided an alternative to the usual mixers for singles
  3. The instructor didn’t take himself seriously, putting everyone at ease
  4. Though it was a club setting, the event was in the early evening so it wasn’t an intimidating “club” scene
  5. By rotating partners, you go to meet a lot of people but not stressful like speed dating        

Evan is a great marketer. He knows how to market his product – salsa dancing – to the right market with the right message. He’s grown his business to include paid online videos and more.   

And me? I didn’t find my true love at the event, but I did fall in love with salsa dancing! 

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Feb 12, 2008
csalomonlee

Celebrex Ad Missed the Mark

Celebrex TV AdThe other day, my husband and I were watching TV and saw this ad. With a blue background, the images were being outlined by words – I’m assuming it was a transcript of the voiceover?  

The way the announcer was proceeding, we thought the ad was an anti NSAID commercial. It described the risks of NSAIDs, including Celebrex. 

We were VERY surprised when the advert was actually for Celebrex. This was a little bit counter intuitive. You’re trying to SELL a drug by discussing what the problems are with them to begin with?  

Pharma Marketing Blog also provides a good break down from the industry perspective.  

But from a consumer perspective, won’t this backfire. Is it just me? You be the judge. Check out the Celebrex ad here.   

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Feb 1, 2008
csalomonlee

PRMeetsMarketing Weekly Articles: January 31, 2008

OK – either I’ve been lazy lately (which is possible) or I’m just not finding things that I want to share. I think I need to expand my list of reading. Until then, here’s this week’s articles.

You can click on the Weekly Articles tag for previous issues or subscribe to the Weekly Articles Feed.

Email Marketing Gone Bad – PR Week demonstrated what NOT to do with email marketing. Per BL Ochman, PR Week spammed thousands of subscribers and exposed passwords.

Pack a Twitter? – This was a topic addressed by Chris Brogan and Dave Fleet. The idea is creating a way for people to find who to follow on Twitter. This post provides advice on using Twitter Packs. Here’s the original post from Chris Brogan. Granted, that depends if Twitter can be stable enough to even allow you to find, follow and tweet!

Beyond the Age of Conversation – Frankly, I go through different stages of reading lots of marketing, PR and technology books and times when I just can’t. The Age of Conversation is one of those books that is waiting anxiously for me to read. I plan to. I just haven’t gotten to it. So it’s interesting that the folks behind the first project are soliciting contributors for the next book. I’m tempted. If you’re planning to contribute, let me know in the comments.

Designing the Right Email Newsletter – I know that this doesn’t usually fall on PR, but I know it does happen. For those asked to write and design an email newsletter, here’s an interesting report on email newsletters from MarketingSherpa. Act now. Only available for one week to non-subscribers.

Jan 24, 2008
csalomonlee

PRMeetsMarketing Weekly Articles: January 24, 2008

 This week’s summary is shorter than usual. Let me know if you have any recommendations for make this a more useful list of information. You can click on the Weekly Articles tag for previous issues or subscribe to the Weekly Articles Feed 

It’s Good to Be Delicious – I so love MarketingPilgrim because I always get nuggets of wisdom that help with PR and marketing. Yahoo is starting to include delicious information into the search results. Whether or not this will augment search rankings, it’s good to know how many other people find the information useful. From a PR perspective, all press releases, marketing materials, etc. should be bookmarked on delicious. You never know who is looking for what where.  

Fact Check EverythingDave Fleet of Fleet PR writes an important post about fact checking everything first. By just omitting some details, the meaning can be completely different.  

Jumping on the Green Bandwagon – This article in MarketingProfs highlights the recent trend to jump on the green bandwagon. I think this is a key thing to keep in mind as companies proceed with sustainability and green programs.  

Online Reputation Management – Paul Dunay provides good tips for managing your online reputation.  Monitor – Respond – Optimize. Check out my previous posts about online reputation management and the tools I used to manage my online reputation.

Effective New Media Mediums for Marketers -  eMarketer is summarized some recent reports about what are effective marketing mediums. For my company, I found it interesting that 54% of marketers found webinars effective. Who knew!

Jan 17, 2008
csalomonlee

PR Meets Marketing Weekly Articles: January 17, 2008

I know you’ve missed your summary of weekly articles. It’s been a slow start to the New Year, but I how you enjoy this week’s selection.

 You can click on the Weekly Articles tag for previous issues or subscribe to the Weekly Articles Feed 

Engagement Overrated?AdAge just released a survey of marketers and media buyers. I’m a little confused by what this survey means frankly. In the end, different mediums are judged by different criteria. Indicative of this contradictory stance: Survey respondents said it’s print — yet ranked print lowest for delivering results. Online was ranked lowest for engagement but highest for results, while TV was ranked in the middle for both results and engagement.   

Baiting for Links – Adotas has an interesting article on how to receive quality links for your website. I’m not sure I agree with adding media mentions into a press release, but there is some good advice for those needing quality links. 

Saying Sorry the Right Way – Andy Beal compares two situations of how Search Engine Land and Gizmodo apologized for recent incidents. Andy highlights the five steps for handling such a situation. Hmmm… Twitter, are you listening?  

Protecting Your Online Brand – Richard MacManus of ReadWriteWeb wrote a post an email  http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/brand_squatting_what_to_do.php 

Why Meet Face-to-Face When Virtual Suffices? – I found this article interesting as part of my role is how to support sales with materials to help in the sell. This article highlights a buyer’s request for an online demo being spurned by sales folks. As a PR/marketing person, this raises a question of what can I do to facilitate the sales cycle. PR has a great opportunity to research, test and introduce new tools that can be used by sales folks. The question is, can you teach a sales person new tricks? =) 

Twitter Pals Galore – The good folks at MarketingPilgrim have compiled an impressive list of online marketing folks on Twitter. Have fun finding people to follow! 

Raising Customer Expectations – Chris Bucholtz of Inside CRM posted a great article of how to exceed customer expectations. No matter how big a company gets, it’s the little things that win over your satisfied and dissatisfied customers. Being proactive and quick to respond goes a long way then sending an impersonal email that arrives weeks later. 

Protecting Your Brand Here, There and Everywhere Richard McManus of ReadWriteWeb about a recent email exchange from a person using the “readwriteweb” brand overseas. Though I am sympathetic with Richard’s dilemma, I believe he received some bad advice. Richard can probably argue for protection in the US but may lose overseas. In the end, brand protection is brand protection. Always trademark. Even if you’re not planning to expand overseas, consider it. You never know.  

Improve PR Programs through Measurement – KD Paine has some useful tips on how measurement provides insight for more effective PR programs. KD uses the word “dashboard” in her post. I believe she means a central place – whether a formal dashboard, database or excel document, that will help you identify and evaluate these points. 

Standing Out in the Tradeshow Crowd – Rohit of Influential Interactive Marketing shares his tips for standing out in a tradeshow. Though I don’t agree with Rohit’s suggestion on a giveaway, I do believe he has some valid points. For those folks going to DEMO this month, my one word of advice is to walk to the space, pull people to the demo, and network at the events. Don’t wait for folks to come to you otherwise you won’t get the full bang for buck at the show.

Jan 14, 2008
csalomonlee

PR Pitching 101: Is Personalization Gone?

Pitch ReviewLast week, I noticed a tweet from Andy Beal about Google PR sending an email on masses to a list of reporters and a few bloggers. His tweets were: Open Quote

Google PR just sent me an email. the CCd instead of BCC – I know have email addys for all major journalists! Woohoohaha  

Open Quote

Wow, this journalist email list is GOLD, shame I’m too ethical to do anything with it  

I was surprised that Google PR didn’t personalize the emails based on the reporter/blogger and beat. Andy’s response was that this was typical depending on the PR person within Google. 

Don’t get me wrong, Google is obviously doing something right. I barely read any negative articles about Google. But this non-personalized approach surprised me. I was always taught to personalize my pitches. Here are my top don’ts for pitching reporters: 

  1. Don’t Misspell Names – Misspelling names turns off the reporter before he or she even reads your pitch. 
  2. Don’t Use Nicknames – unless you’re absolutely sure, I would err on using the reporter’s full name. Make sure you remember point 1.
  3. Don’t Generalize Pitches – research the reporter to make sure that you target your pitch to his/her beat. Using a general pitch can backfire as it’s obviously a mass emailing.
  4. Don’t Mass CC Reporters – this one refers to what Google PR did. If you have to mass email reporters, at least use the BCC line. Otherwise, you’re advertising who you’re pitching and possible competitors in the email.

 Any thoughts or other recommendations for PR Pitching?

About

Cece Salomon-LeeCece Salomon-Lee is director of product marketing for Lanyon Solutions, Inc. and author of PR Meets Marketing, which explores the intersection of public relations, marketing, and social media.

This blog contains Cece's personal opinions and are not representative of her company's.

Learn more about Cece.

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